Winter Winds

The turgid winds of winter howl their woe,

Blow their hurt fiercely against frosty panes.

Don’t they have somewhere else more kind to go;

A wood, perhaps, or a still summer lane?

©2021 KT Workman


Poetry form used: quatrain


Image by Luxurybackground-com from Pixabay

Murder For Hire

vengeful crows perch on a wire
watch me through the window
a morose murder for hire

their sullen gaze never tires
sloe eyes tell me they know
vengeful crows perch on a wire

they have seen my dark desires
witnessed my bloody tableau
a morose murder for hire

their voices raise in a raucous choir
my guilty face they know
vengeful crows perch on a wire

I fear my circumstance is dire
as they wait for darkness to grow
a morose murder for hire

the sagacious birds plan my funeral pyre
beneath the half-moon’s ashen glow
vengeful crows perch on a wire
a morose murder for hire

©2021 KT Workman



Poetry form: villanelle


Image by loveombra from Pixabay

Autumn

algid November

flutters red and yellow leaves

waves at creeping frost


a bite crisp and cool

rides a pine-scented zephyr

kisses tired, brown oaks


©2021 KT Workman


Poetry form: haiku


Image by Heike Frohnhoff from Pixabay

Summer Storm

rain sheets dark pavement

mist ascends from hot, black road
blinds blank yellow eyes

©2021 KT Workman

Poetry form: haiku


Image by Jerzy Górecki from Pixabay

Memories

some things
do not stay long
here…and then too soon gone
they linger in our memories…
always

©2021 KT Workman

Poetry form: American cinquain


Image by Michal Jarmoluk from Pixabay

Dog Days

summer dog days flee
from autumn’s cooling drizzle
dying red leaves sigh

©2021 KT Workman


Poetry form: haiku


Image by chulmin park from Pixabay

Facing the Wind

I pilot an onyx boat of braille
Through a sea of wicked storms.
Facing the wind, I need no false friends
Whose love proved to be only lukewarm.

‘Neath an eclipsed moon, I rig my sails
Scribed with black cuneiforms.
I need no false friends, facing the wind,
I laugh at angry, purple-faced storms.

Charybdis swirls opens, maw inhales;
My boat stabs through, bow a thorn.
Facing the wind, I need no false friends
To offer up hope, pity, or scorn.

My boat rides high, powered by my wail
To adumbral shores forlorn.
I need no false friends, facing the wind,
For darkness keeps my gelid soul warm.

©2021 KT Workman

Poetry form used: ZaniLa Rhyme


Image by mskathrynne from Pixabay

Red Oyster

The future was her red oyster—
Red like her passion, uncloistered.
Red like her heart, ripe for a coup.
A time long gone, when youth was new.

A young conqueror stole her heart,
Took a vow they never would part.
In time, he cleaved her heart in two.
A time long gone, when youth was new.

Though battle-scarred she tried again
To find a love that was a friend,
But her mind, he did not value.
A time long gone, when youth was new.

Closed to the world, free to the page,
With pen of red, she spills out rage.
She never knew a love that’s true…
A time long gone, when youth was new.

The future was her red oyster—
A time long gone, when youth was new.

©2021 KT Workman

(Note: [I deviated from the standard fourteen lines, adding in an extra quatrain. The poem seemed to call for it] A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be: A-a-b-B, c-c-b-B, d-d-b-B, A-B –or- A-b-a-B, c-b-c-B, d-b-d-B, A-B. Definition taken from Shadow Poetry.)


Image by 호영 이 from Pixabay

Thirsty

lightning forks black sky
punctures purple, pregnant clouds
quenches poor, parched earth

©2021 KT Workman

Poetry form: haiku

Image by David Mark from Pixabay

To Soar

To soar
Above it all
Be as the lone eagle
Free of earthly ties that strangle
A life

A life
Unborn, wings clipped
By karma’s unkind teeth
Fell from the nest too soon onto
Fate’s ground

Fate’s ground
Strewn with fierce rocks
Seeded in thorns and glass
Where nothing can grow…or spread wings
And fly

And fly
Unchained, unleashed,
Unshackled, unfettered,
Unrestrained, unconfined, unbound
…uncaged

Uncaged—
I long to be
Foot loose and fancy-free
Sailing winds of my own making
To soar…

©2021 KT Workman

(Note: Crown Cinquain—a series of 5 (entire) Crapsey Cinquains, 25 lines total. Syllable count 2-4-6-8-2 in each stanza; written with breaks between stanzas. Rhyme is optional. The last line of the previous cinquain is repeated as the first line of the next cinquain. The final line of the last cinquain does not have to equal the first line of the first cinquain, but is optional.)

Credit for the definition goes to Abigail Gronway at Dark Side of the Moon.


Image by Ondřej Šponiar from Pixabay